MERRITONE ROCK STEADY 2: THIS MUSIC GOT SOUL (2X12 LP)
MERRITONE ROCK STEADY 2: THIS MUSIC GOT SOUL (2X12 LP)

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Artist

Various

Titel

MERRITONE ROCK STEADY 2: THIS MUSIC GOT SOUL (2X12 LP)

Label

Dub Store Records / DSRLP012


2x12 inch lp
a1: hopeton lewis - this music got soul
a2: hopeton lewis - let me come on home
a3: the zodiacs - walk on by
a4: termites - we gonna make it
a5: the dynamites - fountain bliss
b1: hopeton lewis - rock a shacka
b2: hopeton lewis - don’t cry
b3: the royals - house upon the hill
b4: the tartans - real gone sweet
b5: the tartans - rolling rolling
c1: hopeton lewis - i don’t want trouble
c2: lester sterling - lester sterling special
c3: the dynamites - if you did love me (take 1)
c4: the tartans - don’t take that train
c5: lynn taitt & the jets - batman (early take)
d1: hopeton lewis - oh tell me darling (take 1)
d2: the tartans - i’m ready
d3: henry buckley - take me back
d4: roland alphonso - sounds of silence
d5: lynn taitt & the jets - batman (early take - rehearsal)
d6: the federal all stars - merritone false starts 2

The birth of rock steady portrayed in a consummate collection from the vaults of Federal Records. Most of them drawn directly from Ken Khouri’s master tapes this miscellany of cool rock steady includes marvellous music from the originator of the genre, the one and only Lynn Taitt, alongside an array of Jamaica’s greatest singers and vocal harmony group.

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2x12 Inch LP
Vinyl
c8t-xn
Black
Ragga Dancehall Reggae
Ska
-
-
27.12.2016
28.12.2016
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American rhythm & blues fervour, boosted by a multitude of sound systems playing 78rpm records on increasingly larger sets, gripped Jamaica from the late forties onwards but, towards the end of the decade, the American audience began to move towards a somewhat softer sound. The driving rhythm & blues discs became increasingly hard to find and the more progressive Jamaican sound system operators, realising that they now needed to make their own music, turned to Kingston's jazz and big band musicians to record one off custom cut discs. These were not initially intended for commercial release but designed solely for sound system play on acetate or 'dub plates' as they would later be termed. These 'specials' soon began to eclipse the popularity of American rhythm & blues and the demand for their locally produced music proved so great that the sound system operators began to release their music commercially on vinyl and became record producers. Clement Coxsone' Dodd, Duke Reid 'The Trojan' and Prince Buster, who operated his Voice Of The People Sound System, were among the first to establish themselves in this new role and the nascent Jamaican recording industry now went into overdrive.

In 1954 Ken Khouri had numbered among the first far sighted entrepreneurs to produce mento records with local musicians (mento is Jamaica's original indigenous music) before progressing to opening Jamaica's first record manufacturing plant. Three years later he moved his operation to Foreshore Road (later renamed Marcus Garvey Drive) where, with the assistance of the inestimable Graeme Goodall, he updated and upgraded his recording studio. The importance of this enterprising move was critical to the development of Jamaican music and its influence both profound and far reaching.

"It was Ken Khouri's Federal Recording Studio, the womb that gave birth to the talented writers, artists and musicians that gave Jamaica its musical identity." Prince Buster

Federal Records was not only the place for the sound system men to record their music but it was also where they had their records manufactured and, consequently, the company enjoyed a near total monopoly on recording and record pressing in Kingston. In 1963 Ken Khouri sold his one track board to Clement 'Coxsone' Dodd, who established Studio One, and Ken imported the first stereo equipment to Jamaica and Federal began making stereo records. The following year WIRL (West Indies Records Limited) opened but the competition served to drive the company on to higher heights. Ken Khouri continued to work on his own productions and, in 1966, the seven inch release of Hopeton Lewis' 'Take It Easy', recorded under the guidance of Trinidadian guitarist Lynn Taitt, ushered in the rock steady era.

These two essential albums showcase a stunning selection of well known hits, and not so well known rarities, from the vast Federal catalogue. All tracks have been transferred direct from the master tapes and assembled with the invaluable assistance of Ken Khouri's son, Paul Khouri, who generously gave Dub Store unlimited access to the Federal tape vaults. The extensive liner notes feature extracts from extensive interviews with Paul Khouri whose knowledgeable recollections of working on Marcus Garvey Drive, not only as a producer but as an engineer and musician, are illuminating and educational. Both sets present an insight into the birth and growth of Federal Records and the Jamaican recording industry and are essential to an understanding of the real roots of reggae music.
(added: 2016-12-27 15:01:27 )
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